Vivett: After Incarceration Comes Reentry

I will go before you and level the mountains [to make the crooked places straight]; I will break in pieces the doors of bronze and cut asunder the bars of iron. – Isaiah 45:2,AMP The last time I wrote and posted a blog, Speak Ya Truth was celebrating the reunification of Mike and Debbie Africa, a couple who spent 40 years apart due to their … Continue reading Vivett: After Incarceration Comes Reentry

Shawnta: So You Let Black Boys Wear Dreadlocks, but When are You Going to Stop Kicking Them Out of Class?

I appreciate the transparency of my fellow Indy K12 writer David McGuire. He is the principal of Tindley Summit, and he recently shared that he used to believe their previous hair policy was right. Up until this school year, at Tindley schools, boys had to keep their hair a certain length which eliminated hairstyles such as braids, dreadlocks, and twists.  In his article, he stated: … Continue reading Shawnta: So You Let Black Boys Wear Dreadlocks, but When are You Going to Stop Kicking Them Out of Class?

Tanesha: If Kells Is Innocent, George Zimmerman Is Too

Sounds crazy, right? But that’s how some of y’all sound with this ridiculous and insulting, “R. Kelly is innocent until proven guilty” argument. George Zimmerman was also found innocent by a court a law but we all know good and damn well he murdered Trayvon Martin. So what’s the difference? Over the past few days, I have vehemently scrolled past every R. Kelly article or … Continue reading Tanesha: If Kells Is Innocent, George Zimmerman Is Too

I Have A Dream

This isn’t about equity anymore. It’s about educational justice and freedom. Black kids are set up for failure at day one. They walk into their kindergarten classroom with optimism, excitement, a sense of being a “big boy” or a “big girl” and most importantly, dreams. But throughout their educational career, those dreams are crushed or marred by falsehoods, traumatic experiences and empty promises. Our communities … Continue reading I Have A Dream

Was School Integration a Blessing or a Curse?

Was school integration a blessing or a curse?  This is a question I debate frequently with people who are education advocates for students of color.  We have a mess on our hands. As a black parent, I can’t even move because I don’t know how my black twin sons will fare in another school.  (If you don’t already know this…just because a school has an … Continue reading Was School Integration a Blessing or a Curse?

Making Good On The Broken Promise Of Education

I attended excellent schools for no other reason than my zip code was home to a high quality and well-resourced school system. A system where expectations are high for everyone: students, staff, and the community at large. There were almost no students of color in my school, except for those who participated in a program designed to bus students in from Boston so they could … Continue reading Making Good On The Broken Promise Of Education

Your Privilege Is The Enemy of My Equity

Picture a youth soccer match where each team is equally equipped with shin guards, cleats, and an experienced soccer coach. You would say that’s level playing field, right? Well, what you don’t see and can’t quantify is the privilege chilling on the sidelines. One of the teams has a parent who happens to be a highly influential city councilperson in a city vying against other … Continue reading Your Privilege Is The Enemy of My Equity

We Cannot Solve Issues of Equity Until We First Acknowledge the Problem

Equity starts with admittance. Equity starts with acknowledgment. Equity starts with accuracy. Admitting that all children are not educated the same and, most importantly, should not be educated the same explains the need for equity. To be quite clear, this brings the acknowledgment that equality can be an enemy of equity. When we open our eyes to this fact we see a need to make … Continue reading We Cannot Solve Issues of Equity Until We First Acknowledge the Problem